Dating a girl with hearing aids questions to ask a new guy your dating

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Here’s a look at some of the challenges various deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing folks are having in ‘mixed’ relationships.For the Deaf, Dating a Hearing Person Can Mean Added Obstacles Dating, it should be acknowledged, is something that’s quite stressful for just about everyone.The AARP fact checker for my column, who was born with hearing loss, pointed out that the Merriam-Webster dictionary defines "impaired" as "being in a less than perfect or whole condition: as disabled or functionally defective." "Contrary to the definition, I believe that I am both whole and unable to hear," she wrote in an email.

In other words, people with disabilities, including hearing loss, want to be recognized because they want equal access, but that doesn't mean they want to be defined by their disability.

But then, I don’t really socialise in deaf circles.

After a (long) while being single, I decided I would try the internet dating thing a try.

" On the other hand, many hearing-health professionals blithely and frequently use the term "hearing impaired." And people with vision loss routinely use the term "vision impaired." Go figure. The only term that seems to be accepted by everyone is "people with hearing loss." There are two problems with that phrase: It's cumbersome and it has no easy singular.

I don't think many people would say, "I am a person with hearing loss." You might say, "I have a hearing loss," or, as I often do, "I have a hearing impairment." However, a number of national organizations have chosen to shift away from using hearing loss altogether in favor of more positive language.

The Hearing Loss Association of America was originally called Self Help for Hard of Hearing People, or SHHH. I often use this in casual conversation, but not in my writing, because in fact I am profoundly deaf in one ear and have limited hearing in the other. "People with disabilities" is the preferred term because it refers to people as people, not as their disability.

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