Dating old photographs postcards

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

The movable objects were locked away in the Secret Museum in Naples, and what could not be removed was covered and cordoned off so as to not corrupt the sensibilities of women, children and the working class.

England's (and the world's) first laws criminalising pornography were enacted with the passage of the Obscene Publications Act of 1857.

In early times, erotic depictions were often a subset of the indigenous or religious art of cultures and as such were not set aside or treated differently than any other type.

The modern concept of pornography did not exist until the Victorian era.

The Romans considered depictions of sex to be decoration in good taste, and indeed the pictures reflect the sexual mores and practices of their culture, as on the Warren Cup.

Sex acts that were considered taboo (such as those that defiled the purity of the mouth) were depicted in baths for comic effect.

dating old photographs postcards-69dating old photographs postcards-62dating old photographs postcards-43dating old photographs postcards-12

Historically, this exception was used in an attempt to ban information about sex education, studies on nudism, and sexually explicit literature.When large-scale excavations of Pompeii were undertaken in the 1860s, much of the erotic art of the Romans came to light, shocking the Victorians who saw themselves as the intellectual heirs of the Roman Empire.They did not know what to do with the frank depictions of sexuality, and endeavored to hide them away from everyone but upper-class scholars.Carved phalli can be seen in places of worship such as the temple of Dionysus on Delos, while a common household item and protective charm was the herm, a statue consisting of a head on a square plinth with a prominent phallus on the front.The Greek male ideal had a small penis, an aesthetic the Romans later adopted.The ancient Greeks and Romans produced much art and decoration of an erotic nature, much of it integrated with their religious beliefs and cultural practices.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!