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That wouldn't matter for the customers whose data had already been taken.Any increased security would be too little too late for them.Ashley claimed to have nearly 40 million users at the time of the breach about a month ago, all apparently in the market for clandestine hookups."Ashley Madison is the most famous name in infidelity and married dating," the site asserts on its homepage. Thousands of cheating wives and cheating husbands signup everyday looking for an affair....With Our affair guarantee package we guarantee you will find the perfect affair partner."The data released by the hackers includes names, passwords, addresses and phone numbers submitted by users of the site, though it's unclear how many members provided legitimate details to open accounts.It's notable, however, that the cheating site, in using the secure hashing algorithm, surpassed many other victims of breaches we've seen over the years who never bothered to encrypt customer passwords."We’re so used to seeing cleartext and MD5 hashes," Graham says."It’s refreshing to see bcrypt actually being used."Here's how the hackers introduced the new data dump: Following the intrusion last month, the hackers, who called themselves the Impact Team, demanded that Avid Life Media, owner of Ashley and its companion site Established Men, take down the two sites.

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"We have explained the fraud, deceit, and stupidity of ALM and their members. Keep in mind the site is a scam with thousands of fake female profiles. It's important to note that Ashley Madison's sign-up process does not require verification of an email address to set up an account, so legitimate addresses might have been hijacked and used by some members of the site.A sampling of the leaked data indicates that users provided random numbers and addresses to open accounts.But files containing credit card transactions likely yield real names and addresses, unless members of the site used anonymous pre-paid cards, which offer more anonymity.hristopher Russell owned a small bar in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland, but, like a lot people these days, figured he had better odds hooking up online.Russell was 40 and going through a divorce, so he wasn't seeking anything serious. Shortly after creating his account, he got an alert that one of them had viewed his profile. In order to see more details and contact her, he had to buy credits.Whether you know it or not, odds are you've encountered one. "The majority of the matches are often bots," says Satnam Narang, Symantec’s senior response manager. Keeping the automated personalities at bay has become a central challenge for software developers.

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