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We’re doing our best to represent the Ontario industry in that regard.

We still have a very significant roads funding program in place to support the industry. John Fraser: I’d like to thank the minister for his response.

I’m going to take a position on this that I want to talk about government policy. Deborah Matthews: Speaker, now the Leader of the Opposition says that he believes that climate change is a major threat to Ontario, but when he ran for leadership not that long ago, he said, “It would not be my plan to bring in a cap-and-trade system or a carbon tax.” Now the PC leader says that we have to do something about climate change, and that something includes putting a price on carbon. That’s what we’re intending to do with this budget. We’re removing the debt retirement charges, which will save our seniors, on average, an additional per year. It’s been 12 days since the Premier announced her plan to nearly double the cost of medication for seniors in Ontario. It’s why they are the wholesalers of the distribution that’s being advanced to grocery chains, for example. Well, there may be some market and commercial sensitivities.

Will the government agree here today that it will not be another Liberal slush fund, it will be conditional on oversight, and that the government will actually give it back to the people of Ontario? I believe Ontarians appreciate that we should direct our greatest effort to those who need the help the most. We’re adding the shingles vaccine, a free vaccine, an estimated 0 saving to each senior. Andrea Horwath: My next question is also for the Acting Premier. We are continuing to provide all the supports necessary for the LCBO to succeed.

The evidence demonstrates the outcomes are better in the community. We’re in the middle of a new expansion program, a new 8 million in our mental health and addiction services in the most recent budget that’s been tabled. They’re voting against supports to an innovative program for high school students to assist with financial literacy. Andrea Horwath: The Acting Premier doesn’t have to worry, Speaker. I ask the minister: Why were you keeping details of this sale of LCBO stores secret from the people of Ontario? We know that the kids who are at Amethyst are not the only kids in the province who are struggling with learning to read.

There are many, many things that we’re doing to transform our mental health services across the province, including at the Royal in Ottawa. Have the courage to ask for treatment,” and then they cut that treatment. Seniors have also seen wait-lists for long-term care get longer and longer. If the Acting Premier wants the list, I’ll give it to her. When will Ontario seniors get the respect that they deserve from this Liberal government? Deborah Matthews: Speaker, the NDP are saying that they are going to vote against 0 million more to home and community care. Minister, I have a document here that outlines an RFP issued by the LCBO on February 24, one day before the budget was released. There is a bigger group, and we need to think through our programs carefully. John Fraser: Ma question est pour le ministre des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts.

The Royal, as well, has benefitted from a substantial new investment in a dedicated CT scan that will benefit patients who are challenged by mental illness. The reality is, mental health is just as important as physical health, but this Premier and this government don’t recognize how cruel it is that they go out during Bell Let’s Talk month and say, “Come forward. They’re voting against 3 million to support kids with autism. However, today I’m asking specifically about the fact that seniors have seen their drug costs double. And now, the Premier is increasing their medication costs and slashing the Ontario drug benefit. We need to figure out how we help all the kids who are struggling to learn to read but have average intelligence.

Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by

The evidence demonstrates the outcomes are better in the community. We’re in the middle of a new expansion program, a new $138 million in our mental health and addiction services in the most recent budget that’s been tabled. They’re voting against supports to an innovative program for high school students to assist with financial literacy. Andrea Horwath: The Acting Premier doesn’t have to worry, Speaker. I ask the minister: Why were you keeping details of this sale of LCBO stores secret from the people of Ontario? We know that the kids who are at Amethyst are not the only kids in the province who are struggling with learning to read.

There are many, many things that we’re doing to transform our mental health services across the province, including at the Royal in Ottawa. Have the courage to ask for treatment,” and then they cut that treatment. Seniors have also seen wait-lists for long-term care get longer and longer. If the Acting Premier wants the list, I’ll give it to her. When will Ontario seniors get the respect that they deserve from this Liberal government? Deborah Matthews: Speaker, the NDP are saying that they are going to vote against $250 million more to home and community care. Minister, I have a document here that outlines an RFP issued by the LCBO on February 24, one day before the budget was released. There is a bigger group, and we need to think through our programs carefully. John Fraser: Ma question est pour le ministre des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts.

The Royal, as well, has benefitted from a substantial new investment in a dedicated CT scan that will benefit patients who are challenged by mental illness. The reality is, mental health is just as important as physical health, but this Premier and this government don’t recognize how cruel it is that they go out during Bell Let’s Talk month and say, “Come forward. They’re voting against $333 million to support kids with autism. However, today I’m asking specifically about the fact that seniors have seen their drug costs double. And now, the Premier is increasing their medication costs and slashing the Ontario drug benefit. We need to figure out how we help all the kids who are struggling to learn to read but have average intelligence.

Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen.

Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students.

A recent Forum poll had some interesting information. Speaker, if the government wants to get public buy-in for their environmental policies, it can’t simply be a cash grab. Will the government commit to making their cap-and-trade policy revenue-neutral? Deborah Matthews: I do want to start by sincerely congratulating the Leader of the Opposition for his change of heart on the environment. If it doesn’t lead to that—talk about government policy, please. Deborah Matthews: This is about policy, because Canada’s reputation was harmed— The Speaker (Hon. I’m not going to debate this: provincial government policy. That’s going to save an enormous amount of money in the reduced co-payment costs for our seniors— The Speaker (Hon. Now she’s giving herself until the end of March, Speaker, to figure out whether a senior making $19,500 a year is affluent. What may occur in respect to a leased premise or an owned premise will be up to the LCBO to determine the best value for taxpayer money and the best value for our returns. Armstrong: My question is to the Minister of Education.

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The evidence demonstrates the outcomes are better in the community. We’re in the middle of a new expansion program, a new $138 million in our mental health and addiction services in the most recent budget that’s been tabled. They’re voting against supports to an innovative program for high school students to assist with financial literacy. Andrea Horwath: The Acting Premier doesn’t have to worry, Speaker. I ask the minister: Why were you keeping details of this sale of LCBO stores secret from the people of Ontario? We know that the kids who are at Amethyst are not the only kids in the province who are struggling with learning to read. There are many, many things that we’re doing to transform our mental health services across the province, including at the Royal in Ottawa. Have the courage to ask for treatment,” and then they cut that treatment. Seniors have also seen wait-lists for long-term care get longer and longer. If the Acting Premier wants the list, I’ll give it to her. When will Ontario seniors get the respect that they deserve from this Liberal government? Deborah Matthews: Speaker, the NDP are saying that they are going to vote against $250 million more to home and community care. Minister, I have a document here that outlines an RFP issued by the LCBO on February 24, one day before the budget was released. There is a bigger group, and we need to think through our programs carefully. John Fraser: Ma question est pour le ministre des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts. The Royal, as well, has benefitted from a substantial new investment in a dedicated CT scan that will benefit patients who are challenged by mental illness. The reality is, mental health is just as important as physical health, but this Premier and this government don’t recognize how cruel it is that they go out during Bell Let’s Talk month and say, “Come forward. They’re voting against $333 million to support kids with autism. However, today I’m asking specifically about the fact that seniors have seen their drug costs double. And now, the Premier is increasing their medication costs and slashing the Ontario drug benefit. We need to figure out how we help all the kids who are struggling to learn to read but have average intelligence. Milczyn: This past weekend, the member from Newmarket–Aurora did not get older; he just got better. She is one of the Ontario Junior Citizen Award recipients, and she will be receiving her award this afternoon. Murray: I’d like to introduce my friend Jeff Mole, who’s in the visitors’ gallery. Dave Levac): I’m very much aware of the happenings in the province, and I’m going to ask that we spend a moment just to reflect on what my job is. Patrick Brown: I had the privilege of touring the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre this past weekend. But the truth is that mental health care facilities in Ontario need the government’s help. Dave Levac): And if you continue, I’ll have to deal with you. I’ll mention it a second time, and that will be the end. Eric Hoskins: It’s right there in the budget document on page 117, the important investments, the new investments that we’re making in our mental health and addiction services, including in our hospitals. Speaker, it’s important to also recognize that mental health is evolving in the sense that the outcomes— Interjections. Dave Levac): The member from Renfrew–Nipissing–Pembroke and the member from Leeds–Grenville. Often, that’s moving them into the community and providing supportive care, like the 1,000 new supportive— The Speaker (Hon. John Yakabuski: This has got to stop— The Speaker (Hon. They’re voting against increasing health care funding by $1 billion, including $345 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen. Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than $16 million to mental health services, in addition to $138 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students. A recent Forum poll had some interesting information. Speaker, if the government wants to get public buy-in for their environmental policies, it can’t simply be a cash grab. Will the government commit to making their cap-and-trade policy revenue-neutral? Deborah Matthews: I do want to start by sincerely congratulating the Leader of the Opposition for his change of heart on the environment. If it doesn’t lead to that—talk about government policy, please. Deborah Matthews: This is about policy, because Canada’s reputation was harmed— The Speaker (Hon. I’m not going to debate this: provincial government policy. That’s going to save an enormous amount of money in the reduced co-payment costs for our seniors— The Speaker (Hon. Now she’s giving herself until the end of March, Speaker, to figure out whether a senior making $19,500 a year is affluent. What may occur in respect to a leased premise or an owned premise will be up to the LCBO to determine the best value for taxpayer money and the best value for our returns. Armstrong: My question is to the Minister of Education.

billion, including 5 million for hospital funding. Andrea Horwath: We will proudly be voting against a Liberal plan that will leave seniors paying more for their drug costs. Children in London have been waiting and hoping for months, only to learn that they may never get these specialized services in the schools. They’re concerned, they’re contacting my office, and they want us to be the voice so that this minister will listen.

Pat Dillon, and his right-hand person, former OLIP intern Igor Delov, will be joining us today. Her name is Darquise Frappier from École secondaire Felix-Ricard. Eric Hoskins: As the finance minister is reminding me, more than million to mental health services, in addition to 8 million that we’re investing in community care, because I would hope the leader of the official opposition would recognize that we need to follow the evidence and the science and what best outcomes exist for those with mental health challenges. If you want to get public buy-in, if you— Interjections. Dave Levac): Making references to “you” means you’re not speaking to me. Now he’s supporting the environment, but for nine years, as a member of the Harper caucus, he sat on his— Mr. They’re voting against the biggest infrastructure investment in Ontario’s history, one that’s going to create 110,000 jobs each year. They wonder why this government capped enrolment at 42 when the program has space for 138 students.

A recent Forum poll had some interesting information. Speaker, if the government wants to get public buy-in for their environmental policies, it can’t simply be a cash grab. Will the government commit to making their cap-and-trade policy revenue-neutral? Deborah Matthews: I do want to start by sincerely congratulating the Leader of the Opposition for his change of heart on the environment. If it doesn’t lead to that—talk about government policy, please. Deborah Matthews: This is about policy, because Canada’s reputation was harmed— The Speaker (Hon. I’m not going to debate this: provincial government policy. That’s going to save an enormous amount of money in the reduced co-payment costs for our seniors— The Speaker (Hon. Now she’s giving herself until the end of March, Speaker, to figure out whether a senior making ,500 a year is affluent. What may occur in respect to a leased premise or an owned premise will be up to the LCBO to determine the best value for taxpayer money and the best value for our returns. Armstrong: My question is to the Minister of Education.

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