Healthy dating options for teens

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It’s never too early to talk to your child about healthy relationships and dating violence.

Starting conversations — even if you don’t think your child is dating — is one of the most important steps you can take to help prevent dating violence.

Many teens fear that their parents may overreact, blame them or be disappointed.

Others worry that parents won’t believe them or understand.

If they do open up, it’s important to be a good listener.

Your child may feel ashamed of what’s happening in their relationship.

A weakened immune system is more prone to outbreaks.

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Trust that your child knows their situation better than you do and will leave when they’re ready. Help your child identify the unhealthy behaviors and patterns in their relationship. With your teen, identify relationships around you (within your family, friend group or community) that are healthy and discuss what makes those relationships good for both partners.

When you’re talking to your teen about a plan of action, know that the decision has to come from . If they’re uncomfortable discussing this with you, help them find additional support.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when trying to help a child who is experiencing dating abuse: When talking to your teen, be supportive and non-accusatory.

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