How reliable is potassium argon dating who is mark hoppus dating

Radiometric dating is based on the decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes that occur naturally in rocks and minerals.These parent isotopes decay to stable daughter isotopes at rates that can be measured experimentally and are effectively constant over time regardless of physical or chemical conditions.he question of the ages of the Earth and its rock formations and features has fascinated philosophers, theologians, and scientists for centuries, primarily because the answers put our lives in temporal perspective.Until the 18th century, this question was principally in the hands of theologians, who based their calculations on biblical chronology.Bishop James Ussher, a 17th-century Irish cleric, for example, calculated that creation occurred in 4004 B. There were many other such estimates, but they invariably resulted in an Earth only a few thousand years old.By the late 18th century, some naturalists had begun to look closely at the ancient rocks of the Earth.

On the contrary, radiometric ages are verified whenever possible and practical, and are evaluated by considering other relevant data.

Second, the rock or mineral must not lose or gain either potassium or argon from the time of its formation to the time of analysis.

By many experiments over the past three decades, geologists have learned which types of rocks and minerals meet these requirements and which do not.

There were other estimates but the calculations were hotly disputed because they all were obviously flawed by uncertainties in both the initial assumptions and the data.

Unbeknownst to the scientists engaged in this controversy, however, geology was about to be profoundly affected by the same discoveries that revolutionized physics at the turn of the 20th century.

There are a number of long-lived radioactive isotopes used in radiometric dating, and a variety of ways they are used to determine the ages of rocks, minerals, and organic materials.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!