Tax treatment liquidating distribution foreign passive investment

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It has significant reserves of oil and natural gas.

Manufactures include processed foods, chemicals, transport vehicles, and electrical machinery.

Foreign direct investment reached billion in 2001, of which .5 billion came from the purchase of Mexico's second largest bank, Banamex, by Citigroup. The last has the country's highest peak, the volcano Citlaltépetl, which reaches 18,406 ft (5,610 m).

GDP: purchasing power parity - 0 billion (2001 est.) GDP - real growth rate: -0.3% (2001 est.) GDP - per capita: purchasing power parity - ,000 (2001 est.) GDP - composition by sector: agriculture: 5% industry: 26% services: 69% (2001 est.) Population below poverty line: 40% (2001 est.) Household income or consumption by lowest 10%: 1.6% percentage share: highest 10%: 41.1% (2001) Distribution of family income - Gini 51.9 (1996) index: Inflation rate (consumer prices): 6.5% (2001 est.) Labor force: 39.8 million (2000) Labor force - by occupation: agriculture 20%, industry 24%, services 56% (1998) Unemployment rate: urban - 3% plus considerable underemployment (2001) Budget: revenues: 6 billion expenditures: 0 billion, including capital expenditures of $NA (2001 est.) Industries: food and beverages, tobacco, chemicals, iron and steel, petroleum, mining, textiles, clothing, motor vehicles, consumer durables, tourism Industrial production growth rate: -3.4% (2001 est.) Electricity - production: 194.367 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - production by source: fossil fuel: 75.91% hydro: 16.88% other: 3.19% (2000) nuclear: 4.02% Electricity - consumption: 182.829 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - exports: 77 million k Wh (2000) Electricity - imports: 2.145 billion k Wh (2000) Agriculture - products: corn, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, cotton, coffee, fruit, tomatoes; beef, poultry, dairy products; wood products Exports: 9 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Exports - commodities: manufactured goods, oil and oil products, silver, fruits, vegetables, coffee, cotton Exports - partners: US 88.4%, Canada 2%, Germany 0.9%, Spain 0.8%, Netherlands Antilles 0.6%, Japan 0.4%, UK 0.4%, Venezuela 0.4%, (2001 est.) Imports: 8 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Imports - commodities: metalworking machines, steel mill products, agricultural machinery, electrical equipment, car parts for assembly, repair parts for motor vehicles, aircraft, and aircraft parts Imports - partners: US 68.4%, Japan 4.7%, Germany 3.6%, Canada 2.5%, China 2.2%, South Korea 2.1%, Taiwan 1.6%, Italy 1.3%, Brazil 1.1% (2001 est.) Debt - external: 1 billion (2001) Economic aid - recipient:

It has significant reserves of oil and natural gas.Manufactures include processed foods, chemicals, transport vehicles, and electrical machinery.Foreign direct investment reached $25 billion in 2001, of which $12.5 billion came from the purchase of Mexico's second largest bank, Banamex, by Citigroup. The last has the country's highest peak, the volcano Citlaltépetl, which reaches 18,406 ft (5,610 m).GDP: purchasing power parity - $920 billion (2001 est.) GDP - real growth rate: -0.3% (2001 est.) GDP - per capita: purchasing power parity - $9,000 (2001 est.) GDP - composition by sector: agriculture: 5% industry: 26% services: 69% (2001 est.) Population below poverty line: 40% (2001 est.) Household income or consumption by lowest 10%: 1.6% percentage share: highest 10%: 41.1% (2001) Distribution of family income - Gini 51.9 (1996) index: Inflation rate (consumer prices): 6.5% (2001 est.) Labor force: 39.8 million (2000) Labor force - by occupation: agriculture 20%, industry 24%, services 56% (1998) Unemployment rate: urban - 3% plus considerable underemployment (2001) Budget: revenues: $136 billion expenditures: $140 billion, including capital expenditures of $NA (2001 est.) Industries: food and beverages, tobacco, chemicals, iron and steel, petroleum, mining, textiles, clothing, motor vehicles, consumer durables, tourism Industrial production growth rate: -3.4% (2001 est.) Electricity - production: 194.367 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - production by source: fossil fuel: 75.91% hydro: 16.88% other: 3.19% (2000) nuclear: 4.02% Electricity - consumption: 182.829 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - exports: 77 million k Wh (2000) Electricity - imports: 2.145 billion k Wh (2000) Agriculture - products: corn, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, cotton, coffee, fruit, tomatoes; beef, poultry, dairy products; wood products Exports: $159 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Exports - commodities: manufactured goods, oil and oil products, silver, fruits, vegetables, coffee, cotton Exports - partners: US 88.4%, Canada 2%, Germany 0.9%, Spain 0.8%, Netherlands Antilles 0.6%, Japan 0.4%, UK 0.4%, Venezuela 0.4%, (2001 est.) Imports: $168 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Imports - commodities: metalworking machines, steel mill products, agricultural machinery, electrical equipment, car parts for assembly, repair parts for motor vehicles, aircraft, and aircraft parts Imports - partners: US 68.4%, Japan 4.7%, Germany 3.6%, Canada 2.5%, China 2.2%, South Korea 2.1%, Taiwan 1.6%, Italy 1.3%, Brazil 1.1% (2001 est.) Debt - external: $191 billion (2001) Economic aid - recipient: $1.166 billion (1995) Currency: Mexican peso (MXN) Currency code: MXN Exchange rates: Mexican pesos per US dollar - 9.1614 (January 2002), 9.3423 (2001), 9.4556 (2000), 9.5604 (1999), 9.1360 (1998), 7.9185 (1997) Fiscal year: calendar year Communications Mexico - Telephones - main lines in use: 12.332 million (2000) Telephones - mobile cellular: 2.02 million (1998) Telephone system: general assessment: low telephone density with about 12 main lines per 100 persons; privatized in December 1990; the opening to competition in January 1997 improved prospects for development domestic: adequate telephone service for business and government, but the population is poorly served; domestic satellite system with 120 earth stations; extensive microwave radio relay network; considerable use of fiber-optic cable, coaxial cable, and mobile cellular service international: satellite earth stations - 32 Intelsat, 2 Solidaridad (giving Mexico improved access to South America, Central America, and much of the US as well as enhancing domestic communications), numerous Inmarsat mobile earth stations; linked to Central American Microwave System of trunk connections; high capacity Columbus-2 fiber-optic submarine cable with access to the US, Virgin Islands, Canary Islands, Morocco, Spain, and Italy (1997) Radio broadcast stations: AM 851, FM 598, shortwave 16 (2000) Radios: 31 million (1997) Television broadcast stations: 236 (plus repeaters) (1997) Televisions: 25.6 million (1997) Internet country code: Internet Service Providers (ISPs): 51 (2000) Internet users: 3.42 million (2001) Transportation Mexico - Railways: total: 18,000 km standard gauge: 18,000 km 1.435- m gauge (2001) Highways: total: 323,977 km paved: 96,221 km (including 6,335 km of expressways) unpaved: 227,756 km (1997) Waterways: 2,900 km note: navigable rivers and coastal canals Pipelines: crude oil 28,200 km; petroleum products 10,150 km; natural gas 13,254 km; petrochemical 1,400 km Ports and harbors: Acapulco, Altamira, Coatzacoalcos, Ensenada, Guaymas, La Paz, Lazaro Cardenas, Manzanillo, Mazatlan, Progreso, Salina Cruz, Tampico, Topolobampo, Tuxpan, Veracruz Merchant marine: total: 44 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 656,594 GRT/987,822 DWT ships by type: bulk 3, cargo 1, chemical tanker 4, liquefied gas 3, petroleum tanker 27, roll on/roll off 3, short-sea passenger 3 note: includes some foreign-owned ships registered here as a flag of convenience: Canada 2, Denmark 1 (2002 est.) Airports: 1,852 (2001) Airports - with paved runways: total: 235 over 3,047 m: 11 2,438 to 3,047 m: 28 914 to 1,523 m: 86 under 914 m: 25 (2001) 1,524 to 2,437 m: 85 Airports - with unpaved runways: total: 1,617 under 914 m: 1,085 (2001) over 3,047 m: 1 2,438 to 3,047 m: 1 914 to 1,523 m: 461 1,524 to 2,437 m: 69 Heliports: 2 (2001) Military Mexico - Military branches: National Defense Secretariat (SEDENA) (including Army and Air Force), Navy Secretariat (including Naval Air and Marines) Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age note: starting in 2000, females were allowed to volunteer for military service (2002 est.) Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 27,229,581 (2002 est.) Military manpower - fit for military males age 15-49: 19,761,440 (2002 service: est.) Military manpower - reaching males: 1,077,536 (2002 est.) military age annually: Military expenditures - dollar $4 billion (FY99) figure: Military expenditures - percent of 1% (FY99) GDP: Transnational Issues Mexico - Disputes - international: none Illicit drugs: illicit cultivation of opium poppy (cultivation in 2001 - 4,400 hectares; potential heroin production - 7 metric tons) and cannabis cultivation in 2001 - 4,100 hectares; government eradication efforts have been key in keeping illicit crop levels low; major supplier of heroin and largest foreign supplier of marijuana and methamphetamine to the US market; continues as the primary transshipment country for US-bound cocaine from South America; major drug syndicates control majority of drug trafficking throughout the country; growing producer and distributor of ecstasy * * * I The Rio Grande forms part of its northeastern border with the U. Mexico has a mixed economy based on agriculture, manufacturing, and the extraction of petroleum and natural gas.In 1821 rebels negotiated independence from Spain, and in 1823 a new congress declared Mexico a republic. In 1993 it ratified the North American Free Trade Agreement.The election of Vicente Fox to the presidency (2000) ended 71 years of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party. Felipe Calderón maintained favourable overall public-approval ratings, he encountered considerable difficulties in advancing his policy agenda during 2008.It is a republic with two legislative houses; its head of state and government is the president.Inhabited for more than 20,000 years, the area produced great civilizations in AD 100–900, including the Olmec, Toltec, Maya, and Aztec.

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It has significant reserves of oil and natural gas.

Manufactures include processed foods, chemicals, transport vehicles, and electrical machinery.

Foreign direct investment reached $25 billion in 2001, of which $12.5 billion came from the purchase of Mexico's second largest bank, Banamex, by Citigroup. The last has the country's highest peak, the volcano Citlaltépetl, which reaches 18,406 ft (5,610 m).

GDP: purchasing power parity - $920 billion (2001 est.) GDP - real growth rate: -0.3% (2001 est.) GDP - per capita: purchasing power parity - $9,000 (2001 est.) GDP - composition by sector: agriculture: 5% industry: 26% services: 69% (2001 est.) Population below poverty line: 40% (2001 est.) Household income or consumption by lowest 10%: 1.6% percentage share: highest 10%: 41.1% (2001) Distribution of family income - Gini 51.9 (1996) index: Inflation rate (consumer prices): 6.5% (2001 est.) Labor force: 39.8 million (2000) Labor force - by occupation: agriculture 20%, industry 24%, services 56% (1998) Unemployment rate: urban - 3% plus considerable underemployment (2001) Budget: revenues: $136 billion expenditures: $140 billion, including capital expenditures of $NA (2001 est.) Industries: food and beverages, tobacco, chemicals, iron and steel, petroleum, mining, textiles, clothing, motor vehicles, consumer durables, tourism Industrial production growth rate: -3.4% (2001 est.) Electricity - production: 194.367 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - production by source: fossil fuel: 75.91% hydro: 16.88% other: 3.19% (2000) nuclear: 4.02% Electricity - consumption: 182.829 billion k Wh (2000) Electricity - exports: 77 million k Wh (2000) Electricity - imports: 2.145 billion k Wh (2000) Agriculture - products: corn, wheat, soybeans, rice, beans, cotton, coffee, fruit, tomatoes; beef, poultry, dairy products; wood products Exports: $159 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Exports - commodities: manufactured goods, oil and oil products, silver, fruits, vegetables, coffee, cotton Exports - partners: US 88.4%, Canada 2%, Germany 0.9%, Spain 0.8%, Netherlands Antilles 0.6%, Japan 0.4%, UK 0.4%, Venezuela 0.4%, (2001 est.) Imports: $168 billion (f.o.b., 2001) Imports - commodities: metalworking machines, steel mill products, agricultural machinery, electrical equipment, car parts for assembly, repair parts for motor vehicles, aircraft, and aircraft parts Imports - partners: US 68.4%, Japan 4.7%, Germany 3.6%, Canada 2.5%, China 2.2%, South Korea 2.1%, Taiwan 1.6%, Italy 1.3%, Brazil 1.1% (2001 est.) Debt - external: $191 billion (2001) Economic aid - recipient: $1.166 billion (1995) Currency: Mexican peso (MXN) Currency code: MXN Exchange rates: Mexican pesos per US dollar - 9.1614 (January 2002), 9.3423 (2001), 9.4556 (2000), 9.5604 (1999), 9.1360 (1998), 7.9185 (1997) Fiscal year: calendar year Communications Mexico - Telephones - main lines in use: 12.332 million (2000) Telephones - mobile cellular: 2.02 million (1998) Telephone system: general assessment: low telephone density with about 12 main lines per 100 persons; privatized in December 1990; the opening to competition in January 1997 improved prospects for development domestic: adequate telephone service for business and government, but the population is poorly served; domestic satellite system with 120 earth stations; extensive microwave radio relay network; considerable use of fiber-optic cable, coaxial cable, and mobile cellular service international: satellite earth stations - 32 Intelsat, 2 Solidaridad (giving Mexico improved access to South America, Central America, and much of the US as well as enhancing domestic communications), numerous Inmarsat mobile earth stations; linked to Central American Microwave System of trunk connections; high capacity Columbus-2 fiber-optic submarine cable with access to the US, Virgin Islands, Canary Islands, Morocco, Spain, and Italy (1997) Radio broadcast stations: AM 851, FM 598, shortwave 16 (2000) Radios: 31 million (1997) Television broadcast stations: 236 (plus repeaters) (1997) Televisions: 25.6 million (1997) Internet country code: Internet Service Providers (ISPs): 51 (2000) Internet users: 3.42 million (2001) Transportation Mexico - Railways: total: 18,000 km standard gauge: 18,000 km 1.435- m gauge (2001) Highways: total: 323,977 km paved: 96,221 km (including 6,335 km of expressways) unpaved: 227,756 km (1997) Waterways: 2,900 km note: navigable rivers and coastal canals Pipelines: crude oil 28,200 km; petroleum products 10,150 km; natural gas 13,254 km; petrochemical 1,400 km Ports and harbors: Acapulco, Altamira, Coatzacoalcos, Ensenada, Guaymas, La Paz, Lazaro Cardenas, Manzanillo, Mazatlan, Progreso, Salina Cruz, Tampico, Topolobampo, Tuxpan, Veracruz Merchant marine: total: 44 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 656,594 GRT/987,822 DWT ships by type: bulk 3, cargo 1, chemical tanker 4, liquefied gas 3, petroleum tanker 27, roll on/roll off 3, short-sea passenger 3 note: includes some foreign-owned ships registered here as a flag of convenience: Canada 2, Denmark 1 (2002 est.) Airports: 1,852 (2001) Airports - with paved runways: total: 235 over 3,047 m: 11 2,438 to 3,047 m: 28 914 to 1,523 m: 86 under 914 m: 25 (2001) 1,524 to 2,437 m: 85 Airports - with unpaved runways: total: 1,617 under 914 m: 1,085 (2001) over 3,047 m: 1 2,438 to 3,047 m: 1 914 to 1,523 m: 461 1,524 to 2,437 m: 69 Heliports: 2 (2001) Military Mexico - Military branches: National Defense Secretariat (SEDENA) (including Army and Air Force), Navy Secretariat (including Naval Air and Marines) Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age note: starting in 2000, females were allowed to volunteer for military service (2002 est.) Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 27,229,581 (2002 est.) Military manpower - fit for military males age 15-49: 19,761,440 (2002 service: est.) Military manpower - reaching males: 1,077,536 (2002 est.) military age annually: Military expenditures - dollar $4 billion (FY99) figure: Military expenditures - percent of 1% (FY99) GDP: Transnational Issues Mexico - Disputes - international: none Illicit drugs: illicit cultivation of opium poppy (cultivation in 2001 - 4,400 hectares; potential heroin production - 7 metric tons) and cannabis cultivation in 2001 - 4,100 hectares; government eradication efforts have been key in keeping illicit crop levels low; major supplier of heroin and largest foreign supplier of marijuana and methamphetamine to the US market; continues as the primary transshipment country for US-bound cocaine from South America; major drug syndicates control majority of drug trafficking throughout the country; growing producer and distributor of ecstasy * * * I The Rio Grande forms part of its northeastern border with the U. Mexico has a mixed economy based on agriculture, manufacturing, and the extraction of petroleum and natural gas.

In 1821 rebels negotiated independence from Spain, and in 1823 a new congress declared Mexico a republic. In 1993 it ratified the North American Free Trade Agreement.

The election of Vicente Fox to the presidency (2000) ended 71 years of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party. Felipe Calderón maintained favourable overall public-approval ratings, he encountered considerable difficulties in advancing his policy agenda during 2008.

It is a republic with two legislative houses; its head of state and government is the president.

Inhabited for more than 20,000 years, the area produced great civilizations in AD 100–900, including the Olmec, Toltec, Maya, and Aztec.

.166 billion (1995) Currency: Mexican peso (MXN) Currency code: MXN Exchange rates: Mexican pesos per US dollar - 9.1614 (January 2002), 9.3423 (2001), 9.4556 (2000), 9.5604 (1999), 9.1360 (1998), 7.9185 (1997) Fiscal year: calendar year Communications Mexico - Telephones - main lines in use: 12.332 million (2000) Telephones - mobile cellular: 2.02 million (1998) Telephone system: general assessment: low telephone density with about 12 main lines per 100 persons; privatized in December 1990; the opening to competition in January 1997 improved prospects for development domestic: adequate telephone service for business and government, but the population is poorly served; domestic satellite system with 120 earth stations; extensive microwave radio relay network; considerable use of fiber-optic cable, coaxial cable, and mobile cellular service international: satellite earth stations - 32 Intelsat, 2 Solidaridad (giving Mexico improved access to South America, Central America, and much of the US as well as enhancing domestic communications), numerous Inmarsat mobile earth stations; linked to Central American Microwave System of trunk connections; high capacity Columbus-2 fiber-optic submarine cable with access to the US, Virgin Islands, Canary Islands, Morocco, Spain, and Italy (1997) Radio broadcast stations: AM 851, FM 598, shortwave 16 (2000) Radios: 31 million (1997) Television broadcast stations: 236 (plus repeaters) (1997) Televisions: 25.6 million (1997) Internet country code: Internet Service Providers (ISPs): 51 (2000) Internet users: 3.42 million (2001) Transportation Mexico - Railways: total: 18,000 km standard gauge: 18,000 km 1.435- m gauge (2001) Highways: total: 323,977 km paved: 96,221 km (including 6,335 km of expressways) unpaved: 227,756 km (1997) Waterways: 2,900 km note: navigable rivers and coastal canals Pipelines: crude oil 28,200 km; petroleum products 10,150 km; natural gas 13,254 km; petrochemical 1,400 km Ports and harbors: Acapulco, Altamira, Coatzacoalcos, Ensenada, Guaymas, La Paz, Lazaro Cardenas, Manzanillo, Mazatlan, Progreso, Salina Cruz, Tampico, Topolobampo, Tuxpan, Veracruz Merchant marine: total: 44 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 656,594 GRT/987,822 DWT ships by type: bulk 3, cargo 1, chemical tanker 4, liquefied gas 3, petroleum tanker 27, roll on/roll off 3, short-sea passenger 3 note: includes some foreign-owned ships registered here as a flag of convenience: Canada 2, Denmark 1 (2002 est.) Airports: 1,852 (2001) Airports - with paved runways: total: 235 over 3,047 m: 11 2,438 to 3,047 m: 28 914 to 1,523 m: 86 under 914 m: 25 (2001) 1,524 to 2,437 m: 85 Airports - with unpaved runways: total: 1,617 under 914 m: 1,085 (2001) over 3,047 m: 1 2,438 to 3,047 m: 1 914 to 1,523 m: 461 1,524 to 2,437 m: 69 Heliports: 2 (2001) Military Mexico - Military branches: National Defense Secretariat (SEDENA) (including Army and Air Force), Navy Secretariat (including Naval Air and Marines) Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age note: starting in 2000, females were allowed to volunteer for military service (2002 est.) Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 27,229,581 (2002 est.) Military manpower - fit for military males age 15-49: 19,761,440 (2002 service: est.) Military manpower - reaching males: 1,077,536 (2002 est.) military age annually: Military expenditures - dollar billion (FY99) figure: Military expenditures - percent of 1% (FY99) GDP: Transnational Issues Mexico - Disputes - international: none Illicit drugs: illicit cultivation of opium poppy (cultivation in 2001 - 4,400 hectares; potential heroin production - 7 metric tons) and cannabis cultivation in 2001 - 4,100 hectares; government eradication efforts have been key in keeping illicit crop levels low; major supplier of heroin and largest foreign supplier of marijuana and methamphetamine to the US market; continues as the primary transshipment country for US-bound cocaine from South America; major drug syndicates control majority of drug trafficking throughout the country; growing producer and distributor of ecstasy * * * I The Rio Grande forms part of its northeastern border with the U. Mexico has a mixed economy based on agriculture, manufacturing, and the extraction of petroleum and natural gas.

In 1821 rebels negotiated independence from Spain, and in 1823 a new congress declared Mexico a republic. In 1993 it ratified the North American Free Trade Agreement.

The election of Vicente Fox to the presidency (2000) ended 71 years of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party. Felipe Calderón maintained favourable overall public-approval ratings, he encountered considerable difficulties in advancing his policy agenda during 2008.

It is a republic with two legislative houses; its head of state and government is the president.

Inhabited for more than 20,000 years, the area produced great civilizations in AD 100–900, including the Olmec, Toltec, Maya, and Aztec.

Mexico is the world's largest producer of silver, bismuth, and celestite.Elections held in July 2000 marked the first time since the 1910 Mexican Revolution that the opposition defeated the party in government, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).Vicente FOX of the National Action Party (PAN) was sworn in on 1 December 2000 as the first chief executive elected in free and fair elections.Some sources judged that the rising retail price and the declining purity of cocaine sold in the U. As shipping cocaine, methamphetamines, and other drugs into the U. became more difficult, traffickers began selling a higher proportion of their product in Mexico, where addiction levels rose steadily.Fragmented cartels waged war against each other for control over lucrative smuggling routes, and they increasingly turned their formidable firepower (derived from sophisticated armaments smuggled from the U. In a particularly gruesome turn, they frequently beheaded their victims as a macabre sign of their determination.The violence claimed victims ranging from rival cartel members to senior federal police commanders and law-enforcement personnel, innocent bystanders caught up in gunfights, and members of Mexican-style country music groups (), whose song lyrics often depicted the lifestyle of drug traffickers.

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