You are the one china dating show

Then, last winter, my college ex-boyfriend, David, appeared as a contestant on a popular Chinese dating show called He’s been living in Beijing for the past six years, having moved there the summer after our college graduation and our break-up.

We keep in occasional contact, so I knew David had already been on TV a couple times before.

For a while after its debut, the show made no attempt to hide some of its contestants' mercenary attitudes towards dating.

When it premiered in 2010, it broke ratings records, boasting more than 50 million viewers.Authorities were concerned that the Chinese dating show was promoting the wrong values, and its producers were instructed to de-emphasize money and sex in the show's discussions and tone down the insults and cruelty.Government authorities also added a psychology teacher as another host to ensure that things wouldn't veer too far off track.My reality TV doppelgänger wears a slouchy hat and a pea coat.In a soft-focus flashback, she wanders alone through a generic cityscape, accompanied by somber piano music.As a student of cultural studies, I was intellectually fascinated: The philosopher Jean Baudrillard portentously wrote in 1986 that “everything is destined to reappear as a simulation”—even the events of your own life.

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